Dread Anxiety - Stuff to Blow Your Mind

Dread Anxiety

by Stuff to Blow Your Mind

stufftoblowyourmind:

Dread Anxiety: What is dread and how are we supposed to cope with it? Find out in this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind.

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Reblogged from stufftoblowyourmind

Creamy Paths Alien Snowboard Binding
Faberge Fractal Cathedral Thicket

skunkbear:

3D Fractals

Last week I met Tom Beddard, a physicist turned web developer turned artist (and friendly guy). He creates fractals — those recursive shapes that infinitely repeat at every scale. They’re based on simple math, but they can create some amazing images.

Says Beddard: “I don’t seek any new mathematical insight into the resulting structures, it’s a purely aesthetic pursuit to scratch a creative itch. Part of the fascination with fractal exploration is when … amazing and completely unexpected structures can pop out and surprise you.”

Some of the fractals look like Gothic architecture. Some of them look like alien seed pods. All of them are mesmerizing. You can see lots more on Beddard’s flickr page. You can actually fly through the fractals and see them morphing in these videos. And now, thanks to a new app called Frax that Beddard helped develop, you can make fractals of your very own.

(via npr)

Source skunkbear

Reblogged from skunkbear

Anti-Syphilis Posters and the Monstrous Feminine
It’s a common trope throughout humanity’s patriarchal history: The otherness of woman is not only alien and unknowable but ultimately the stuff of monstrosity.


We see it in myth cycles, folklore, witchcraft persecution and various interpretations of human reproduction. Rather than equal (or, realistically, greater) examples of the species, women are seen as beings of bloody cycles, physical corruption and moral failing.
It should come as no surprise that such misogynistic garbage turns up in the history of syphilis… (click the image to read & see more)

Anti-Syphilis Posters and the Monstrous Feminine

It’s a common trope throughout humanity’s patriarchal history: The otherness of woman is not only alien and unknowable but ultimately the stuff of monstrosity.

We see it in myth cycles, folklore, witchcraft persecution and various interpretations of human reproduction. Rather than equal (or, realistically, greater) examples of the species, women are seen as beings of bloody cycles, physical corruption and moral failing.

It should come as no surprise that such misogynistic garbage turns up in the history of syphilis… (click the image to read & see more)