Does fist-pumping music have the power to increase performance and make each individual person feel invincible? And can you improve your odds in life with a simple posture fix?

The Horror Movie Aphrodisiac - Stuff to Blow Your Mind

The Horror Movie Aphrodisiac

by Stuff to Blow Your Mind

Are horror movies a sure-fire aphrodisiac? Does the haunted house really exit into the bed room? Join Robert and Julie as they examine the old scary movie seduction trope and look for the scientific connection between scares and sexual arousal.

Image Caption: How could I not go with Brad and Janet from “The Rocky Horror Picture Show" on this one? In this cult-classic 1975 musical, we see a sexually repressed couple ascend from an almost nonsexual hetero state to dizzying transsexual heights, all via their terrifying experiences with otherworldly horror.

Related Content:

How Haunted Houses Work

10 Horror VHS Boxes That Scarred Me For Life

21 Psychedelic Horror Films

The Science of Uncanny Music (podcast)

The Horror (podacst)

Naked Terror (podcast)

Naked and Afraid (video)

Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board (podcast)

The Monster of the Week Blog Series

The Monster Science Video Series

The Monster Gallery

Monster Mash: Mummies and Trolls (podcast)

Into the Graveyard (podcast)

Frankenstein’s Monster (podcast)

The Mirror Maze of ‘Oculus’ (One of the movies Robert mentions)

Outside Content:

The Capilano Suspension Bridge (the bridge itself!)

"Some evidence for heightened sexual attraction under conditions of high anxiety" by Dutton and Aron (PDF)

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Artatomical: T-shaped Incision by Max Brödel
Here’s another dose of Artatomical for you, in which we stand back and consider the intersection of art and science in the realm of medical illustration. This time it’s an illustration by German-American artist Max Brödel (1870-1941), from the 1922 text “Diseases of the Kidneys, Ureters and Bladder” by gynecologist Howard Atwood Kelly…

Artatomical: T-shaped Incision by Max Brödel

Here’s another dose of Artatomical for you, in which we stand back and consider the intersection of art and science in the realm of medical illustration. This time it’s an illustration by German-American artist Max Brödel (1870-1941), from the 1922 text “Diseases of the Kidneys, Ureters and Bladder” by gynecologist Howard Atwood Kelly…